St Bride's: Music - Lunchtime Recitals

'Jane Austen and the Piano'
Judith Gore – piano

Friday, 11 May at 1:15pm - FREE ADMITTANCE - Retiring Collection

'Jane Austen and the Piano'<br />Judith Gore – piano

Niccolò Piccinni

Overture to La Buona Figliuola

  i. Spiritoso

 ii. Andante

iii. Presto

Joseph Haydn

Sonata in C major Hob XVI/35

  i. Allegro con brio

 ii. Adagio

iii. Finale: Allegro

Maria Reynolds Park

Sonata in B flat major op. 1

 i. Allegro moderato

ii. Presto

Johann Sterkel

Sonata in C major op. 3

i. Allegro

ii. Minuet and trio

František Kočvara

The Battle of Prague

'Jane Austen and the Piano'

Piccinni: Overture to La Buona Figliuola
Niccolò Piccinni, not to be confused with Puccini, was an Italian composer of the Baroque Period and was born in Bari, Italy in 1728 and died in 1800. He produced a wealth of operas and was the singing master of Marie Antoinette. The work presented in this recital is the keyboard version of the overture to his opera La Buona Figliuola. The opera is in three acts and was first performed in Rome in 1760 and in London in 1766.

The overture is divided into three movements, opening in the key of D major, then D minor for the second movement, returning to the major for the final movement. Repeated bass notes and tremolando broken octaves in the right hand part are particular features which create a lively atmosphere in the first movement. This is followed by a stately Minuet which provides a complete contrast in character, with two part contrapuntal writing and ornamentation. The finale is marked Presto and uses double thirds to enhance the melodic line.

Haydn: Sonata in C Major Hob.XVI/ 35
This sonata was composed around 1777-79 and is the first of six sonatas dedicated to the Von Auenbrugger sisters who studied with Haydn. Various features of this sonata, according to the composer and Haydn expert John McCabe, include the use of Alberti bass in one hundred bars and a fanfare figure in the first movement. There are startling changes of key and several cadential pauses with embellishment. The second movement is bigger in harmonic content and the finale is a perky little rondo.

Maria Reynolds Park: Sonata in B Flat Major op. 1
This sonata was composed by Maria Hester Reynolds. Park was her married name and she was known as Reynolds Park. She was born in 1760 and died in 1813. She performed both piano and harpsichord in public. She composed many solo works and a concerto. One of her pupils was the Duchess of Devonshire and the set of Opus 1 Sonatas was dedicated to another pupil, the Countess of Uxbridge. She lived in Hampstead, London and her house still exists in Church Row near the High Street and bears a plaque which ironically only gives her husband's name.

The Sonata in B Flat Major is from her earliest set of works for keyboard, published in 1785 and is the second in a set of six sonatas written with an obligato violin part. There are only two movements. The first movement follows the traditional sonata form movement with an Exposition, Development and Recapitulation. The second movement is in two sections and features double thirds with arpeggiated accompaniment. The style is similar to Mozart and the composer herself was often described as the English Mozart.

Sterkel: Sonata in C Major op. 3
Johann Franz Xavier Sterkel was born in 1750 in Wurzburg Germany and studied at the University there. He toured Italy as a pianist from 1779 to 1782 and wrote mainly instrumental music including symphonies, concertos, chamber works, piano sonatas and piano duets. He was the court composer at Mainz between 1793 to 1797, and died in 1817.

This sonata is the first of a set of six keyboard sonatas and its lyrical writing looks forward to Schubert. Although it is described as a sonata, it is only three pages consisting of two movements. The first movement contains features such as Alberti bass accompanying melodies and triplets, dotted rhythms and ornamentation. The second movement is a minuet and trio which also uses triplets and ornamentation.

Kotzwara: The Battle of Prague Op 23
The Battle of Prague is a musical drama which describes the battle in 1757 between the Kingdom of Prussia and the Habsburg Monarch. František Kotzwara was a Czech composer born in 1730 In Prague. He was also a violist and virtuoso double bass player. He settled in England where he performed in the Handel Commemoration in 1791 and also played in the orchestra of the King's Theatre. He died in London in 1791. The Battle of Prague was published in 1788. The music encompasses the sound of canons, horsemen and a Turkish dance. The English National Anthem also makes an appearance. It is a lively piece and was also played by Emily Bronte. It is mentioned twice by Mark Twain in his books.

Programme notes by Judith Gore

Judith Gore was born in Southport. She studied piano with Phyllis Eley and was the pianist for the Loreto Bersi Academy of Dance playing for the examinations of the Royal Academy of Dance. At seventeen she won the Liverpool Piano Student of the Year. She studied Music at Liverpool University and was awarded a BA degree. She specialised in solo performance and was the pianist for the University ballet classes. She was a finalist in the Alsop Composers Competition and her Piano Trio was performed by members of Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra. After a postgraduate certificate in music education from London University, she taught at secondary level for twenty years. She was awarded a Master's degree in Literature from Liverpool University, a Piano Recital Diploma from Trinity College London followed by further piano studies at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama.
She has performed for BBC Radio 3 at the Bridgewater Hall Manchester, the BBC Television Centre London and the University of Leeds. Other London performances include Steinway Hall, St John's Smith Square, 1901 Arts Club, Burgh House Hampstead, salon concerts in Belgravia, Westminster and Richmond, churches in Kensington, Regent's Park and City areas, Schott Recital Room and Clementi House Kensington. She was invited to give a lecture recital about Liszt for the London International Piano Symposium at the Royal College of Music and gave Liszt performances at Cardiff Millennium Centre, Kellogg College Oxford and the Pickmann Hall in Boston, USA.

Judith played in the French piano music masterclass of Pascal Rogé in the Debussy anniversary year at the North Wales International Music Festival. She performed in the Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival and the Satie Vexations at the Cheltenham and Chelsea Festivals. Last season she performed in Vienna at the Akademisches Gymnasium in Beethoven Platz and played for the New York Piano Society at the Baruch Performing Arts Centre in Manhattan.

Judith's musicological interests include the life and works of Liszt, English composers, music heritage, Music and Literature. She advised the location of the heritage plaque for Liszt in Liverpool to commemorate the performance of the Weber Konzerstuck by Liszt at the old Theatre Royal in 1840. Her Liszt research has taken her to Budapest, Weimar, Raiding and Bayreuth. She has written articles for the Liszt Society newsletters and is a member of the Royal Musical Association.  She has played in many museums including the Chopin birthplace near Warsaw, the Brahms Museum in Hamburg, the Bartok House in Budapest and the Schumann museums in Zwickau and Leipzig. She will be performing the Jane Austen recital at the Fitzwilliam Museum Cambridge. She is a member of the Royal Philharmonic Society.

Judith Gore was born in Southport. She studied Music at Liverpool University and London University and has a Master's degree in Literature. She was awarded a Piano Recital Diploma from Trinity College London, followed by further piano studies at the Guildhall School of Music. She has performed for BBC Radio 3 at the Bridgewater Hall Manchester, the BBC Television Centre London and the University of Leeds. Other London performances include Steinway Hall, St John's Smith Square, 1901 Arts Club, Burgh House Hampstead, salon concerts in Belgravia and Richmond, Schott Recital Room, Chelsea Festival. She gave a lecture recital for the London International Piano Symposium at the Royal College of Music. She is a member of the Royal Philharmonic Society.